Stories from the Field

Stories from the Field (8)

Kennedy is a 12-year-old, single orphaned boy who lives in Malembo village, Group Village Head Dalamponda, Traditional Authority Nsanama in Machinga district. His father died in 2014 leaving him to be looked after by his mother. Being a single parent and in dire poverty, the mother could not manage to provide for the family. Both Kennedy and his mother would go to sleep for some days without food. They had no land to cultivate and no assets or livestock to raise money from. This made Kennedy go hunting mice in order to get food for his mother and himself.

Village Savings and Loans (VSL) Groups play a crucial role in bringing financial services to rural  areas  where  formal  financial institutions, such as banks, are limited or cannot be afforded by the surrounding populations.

“As a facilitator of these groups, I have seen people transform into independent and financially stable individuals. Most of these people were poor and widowed, raising orphans and/or dealing with the burdens of HIV but now they are a source of inspiration for their community,” shares Community Engagement Facilitator Patricia Makumbi.

Life for 23-year-old Sherifa Demba (also known as Cecelia Chisema) has taken a hopeful turn and she has a timely community announcement to thank.

A year ago, Sherifa’s thoughts were plagued with “what ifs” as the derailed plan for her life left her depressed and filled with regret.

With sadness in her eyes Mary Kulima, Sherifa’s grandmother, explains, “Sherifa was a very intelligent girl. I believed she took after her mother who is an excellent primary school teacher. Unfortunately, Sherifa chose to ignore everything we taught her when she fell in love with Lasten.”

At the heart of One Community’s (One C) efforts is the Malawian child. Orphans, vulnerable children and their caregivers face tremendous health, social and economic challenges on a daily basis. This booklet, One Community-Saving Lives is a collection of 18 stories selected to show how One C’s work has helped adolescent girls, young women, and caregivers of children take back their lives, often from the precipice, and how communities are being empowered to question their living conditions and take action to change them for the better.

These stories showcase human resilience and how a little external support delivered in an efficient manner, and in collaboration with local communities can increase their agency, steer them away from the path of desolation and hopelessness towards hope for the future and belief in themselves. These stories were collected over a one-year period (October 2016 – September 2017). At One Community, we believe that these stories add meaning to the numbers and statistics that one would find in our annual report, and are a testimony that with the support of PEPFAR through USAID, One C is saving many lives.

The booklet will be shared with our donors, implementing partners, government stakeholders and the general public.

All stories were written with consent from concerned parties and they are aware of the purpose behind the narratives

Click here to download Booklet

“My oldest sister wanted me to die. My sickness brought too many extra problems for the family. I would spend nights sleeping outside or on the cold floor without a blanket and often times she would beat me up” Reminisced a sad Judie Lemucha of Tambala village, Mulanje.

Ten-year-old Judie is the fifth in a family of six. Until February 2017, her life story had been characterized by desolation, abuse and neglect. This all begun when she lost her mother and father to HIV at the age of two. Judie’s oldest sister, Odeta, who was 19 at the time of their parent’s death, assumed the role of household head. This was not an easy task for Odeta as she had two children of her own.

For twenty-three-year-old Community Engagement Facilitator, Bridget Namacha, her job is a realization of a personal journey which started when her closest Aunt nearly died due to an undiagnosed HIV infection in 2007.

“During that time, not much was known about HIV. My Aunt discovered very late what had been causing her recurrent illness. She would have died if she hadn’t eventually gotten tested for HIV and started her treatment.”

Her Aunt’s gift of life is a constant inspiration. Bridget has committed her time to bringing HIV testing services to her community and ensuring that those who test positive get on treatment immediately. Coincidentally, Bridget was hired by One Community - USAID’s flagship community based HIV prevention and impact mitigation project.

For months on end, sickness was a term 24 year old Edina Sitande was very familiar with. In the months of December 2016 her situation had gotten so bad that she could barely care for her children. Her husband’s disappearance from the village to remarry did not help with her situation.

A dedicated mother of 2, Edina comes from Machinga, a district in the southern region of Malawi where the burden of HIV has left 14.5% of the population vulnerable. Yet this statistic did not resonate with Edina.

“Even when I was at my weakest state, HIV was not what concerned me; I assumed I had malaria as the disease was rampant in the area.” Edina reminisced.

Like many girls in rural Malawi, Carolyn Mkhunga found herself in an abusive marriage at the early age of 16.

“He would go drinking and leave me alone at home for days. I would hear stories about where he had been and the women he was seeing.’’

Pregnant and alone Carolyn battled many fears, she worried about her unborn child and the environment he or she would grow up in. She worried about her husband’s infidelities and the chance that he might give her HIV. Most of all she was constantly troubled by the sad reality of her current life, with very few options.